Carburetor Question

Engine & Related

  1. RonLiv

    RonLiv Member

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    OK, I have a 1969 Roadrunner. It has a matching 383ci engine with a 4bbl carb. At the moment the car has an Edelbrock Carb, not sure which one but my guess is its the AVS version since that is what I understand was stock, the difference being Plymouth was using the Carter Carburetor. I believe from what research I've done the correct Automatic Trans and No Air carburetor was Carter 4616S. If you had Air and Automatic it was a 46385S. Not sure if they are interchangeable or not, but I would think the Air Conditioning Carb would work in a non-air car and not the other way around. To be honest, I'm pretty far from being a mechanic. I know where the key goes and where to put the gas in, but that is about as qualified as I am to work on an engine. Anyway, I've given some thought to finding a Carter and having it installed in the interest of originality. But I haven't read a whole lot of good things about the Carter, which I'm thinking is probably why the previous owner of the car swapped it out. Any thoughts on this?
     
  2. Coyote

    Coyote Well-Known Member

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    IMHO, if it works and ain’t broke don’t fix it. The Edlebrock’s are the updated AFB/AVS pattern carbs. With a full size air cleaner, nobody but an expert can tell what you’ve got under there anyhow.
     
  3. Bill Monk

    Bill Monk Well-Known Member

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    Easy to tell the difference, on an afb, the secondaries are open and the avs has an air door over the secondaries (kind of looks like a choke. Check this out for pictures of each: http://www.carbkitsource.com/carbs/tech/Carter/AFB-AVS-index.html
    I'm with Coyote though, unless you are going for a concours restoration, who cares
     
    Russ69Runner likes this.

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