Clutch fan Drives

Engine & Related

  1. TOMRR

    TOMRR Well-Known Member

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    I have two fan clutches one is a AC and the other 070 NON AC. As you can see the AC has a longer shaft and would put the fan in to the shroud where it should be. The 070 putts the fan slightly into the shroud. The is a non ac car and do not care if one is right or wrong. as long as it works for the best cooling !!. the 070 fan clutch is the real deal and Not A Repop !! Has been restored and might be up for sale. Is there any reason that the AC Clutch Fan Drive would not work on a Non Ac Car ?
    Thanks Tom C. 29339499_1603316456400789_1693593268925208768_n.jpg 29258589_1603316603067441_1260630944618800729_n.jpg
     
  2. 69hemibeep

    69hemibeep Sponge Bob Square Wheels

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    The fan ideally should be a third of the way into the shroud. That 070 clutch is worth its weight in gold and I just used a repop in my 383 project
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2018
  3. TOMRR

    TOMRR Well-Known Member

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    I have a 1969 hp 440 in my 69 RR .Way doesn't 070 put the fan where it should be ? I ran the 070 fan last summer with no issues but have notice other cars with the fan into the shroud more. And just notice the other day the difference in shaft lenth
     
  4. dmartin

    dmartin Well-Known Member

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    Man I would get rid of that clutch fan and get a direct drive fan never have to wonder if the clutch goes out
     
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  5. Ranger

    Ranger Well-Known Member

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    I agree with dmartin. I have the direct drive (non A/C car) and the fan is about half way into the shroud I added (which is what I always thought was the correct depth). Works perfectly.
     
  6. Big John

    Big John Sit back, relax Don't bitch about the cigar smoke

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    I started using the Hayden 2797 "Severe Duty" fan clutch in my 300 after a knowledgeable friend had recommended it. As he said "It can blow your hat off". It's not really listed for Mopar applications, but it does fit. It was part of the solution to my low speed cooling issues I was having with the A/C on.

    This will give you some length dimensions to be sure it fits your application. Page 345

    http://www.haydenauto.com/upload/HaydenAuto/Documents/Cat_Hayden/2013_HaydenCatalog_FINAL.pdf

    BTW, don't store the fan clutches in the positions shown in the pictures in the first post. The silicone fluid will eventually drain past the seals and ruin the clutch.
     
  7. Big John

    Big John Sit back, relax Don't bitch about the cigar smoke

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    I disagree with both you guys.

    The clutch is there to allow a very aggressive fan to be used and to take advantage of it at lower speeds. At higher speeds, when the fan becomes redundant, the clutch allows the fan to slip and therefore not tax the engine.

    It's basically good cooling with free horsepower... and if you look at the optional trailer towing, A/C, Performance Axle Package and the High Performance Package that was offered when our cars were new, you'll see that aggressive 7 blade clutch fan, a fan shroud and a 26" radiator. The A12 and Hemi cars came standard with the clutch fan, shroud and 26" rad. Again.. Superior cooling for harder usage.

    It doesn't make any sense to start trying to bolt on aftermarket parts that might add a few HP at the higher RPM and then give away HP to run the fan because you are concerned about it not working.

    The way our cars are used these days is way different than when they were new. I never waited in traffic in, let's say 1973, the way I do now. I didn't have to put up with crappy gas and I could run the ignition lead up where it belongs and still run nicely on the Hi-Test I bought for 35 cents a gallon at the corner. Cooling has become much more of an issue than it was when these cars were new.

    That said... and here's where I get on my soap box... Most of the cooling issues I see are because the basics aren't followed. Example: My own car... The previous owner replaced the radiator with an aftermarket aluminum piece to "fix" the issue. Of course, it didn't... The car still ran hot at idle. I bought the car and my intention was to replace all the missing A/C bits and pieces. I run my cars hard and put them up wet... I expect them to perform correctly and not overheat and piss anti-freeze all over the place. I don't use any gas additives etc.

    First order of business was to look at what the issues were and start fixing them one by one. The thermostat... Holy crap... a 192 degree 'stat. OE was 180 degrees.. I replaced that with a 160 degree because I knew they worked nicely in the summer months, but the 180 would have done the same. That took 15 degrees off the temp at idle. Next was a real radiator with a shroud.. and a 7 blade fan with a clutch. The first clutch was a cheap Auto Zone as that was the only thing I could get on short notice. (I was headed to Carlisle that weekend). The car ran much cooler and I was no longer worried about overheating while sitting in traffic. The "Severe Duty" clutch came a little later and now the temperature gauge doesn't raise at all. So.. Just basics... No junk electric fans... No aluminum radiators... and only two concessions to modern driving (the SD clutch and the 160 stat) and I can drive it anytime. Temp runs about 170-190 all the time, with the A/C blowing ice cold. Basic, no Mickey Mouse solution to a basic problem and quite frankly, most of it was cured by replacing parts that were removed in the name of "better cooling".
     
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  8. Ranger

    Ranger Well-Known Member

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    You make good points John and I can't argue with them. My car came with the 7 blade direct drive so I just kept it. I was running rather hot when I first bought it, but after removing the OEM 190 stat and replaced it with a 180 and added a shroud, she runs right where she should at about 180 (with a 22" OEM radiator).
    EDIT: Even in stop and go traffic in 90 degree weather.

    I get the free HP thing at speed, but in my case, it's not needed. She's just a cruiser now.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2018
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  9. Terry Hauck

    Terry Hauck Choadicus

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    What do you guys think of Flex Fans? I have a flex fan and a 160 thermostat. I live in the desert and it cools fine. No AC car so I don't drive it much in the summer out here.
     
  10. Big John

    Big John Sit back, relax Don't bitch about the cigar smoke

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    Saw one blow a hole through the hood of a friend's big block Nova once. He had just staged the car and I was up near the starting line at the time.

    A local guy had a blade come off his flex fan and cut his throat while timing his car. It killed him.

    I'll let you figure what I think of them based on that, but probably a bunch of guys will say how much they love their flex fans.
     
  11. quikbird

    quikbird Well-Known Member

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    Problem with them is that they "work harden" if you will, and then crack off.
     

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